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No 62. Decolonial Communism, Democracy & the Commons

Editors: Catherine Samary & Fred Leplat
Price
€19.00

No 62. Decolonial Communism, Democracy & the Commons

Contributions from Samuel Farber, Silvia Federici, Franck Gaudichaud, Zagorska Golubović, Ernest Mandel, Goran Marković, Svetozar Stojanović and Raquel Varela.

How far did the Bolcheviks introduce a ‘decolonial communism’,  later destroyed by Stalin’s ‘socialism in one country’? Did the Tito-Stalin break in 1948 and the other revolutions transform these objectives? How far did the struggles and debates in the Yugoslavia of ‘market socialism’ in the mid 1960s follow a path towards democracy and the commons?

The contributors in this book review past and present experiences and Catherine Samary reconsiders the debates in the light of current thinking.

Table of Contents:

Author’s note ................................................................................................................................... 1

Introduction, Catherine Samary ...................................................................................................... 3

GENERAL OUTLOOK ................................................................................................................ 22

October 1917-2017: From a decolonial communism to the of the commons,

Catherine Samary ......................................................................................................................... 23

From the October Revolution to Stalinisation ............................................................................. 27

Pursuit of the permanent revolution after Stalin .......................................................................... 40

From the ‘great debate’ in Cuba to a self-managed system ......................................................... 53

Bibliography ................................................................................................................................ 75

THE YUGOSLAV EXPERIENCE ............................................................................................... 98

Yugoslavia since the revolution: a few key dates ......................................................................... 99

Yugoslav self-management: a balance sheet, Catherine Samary ................................................ 103

Socialism and humanism, Zagorka Pešić-Golubović ................................................................. 132

The June student movement and social in Yugoslavia, Svetozar Stojanović .............................. 149

From post-revolutionary dictatorship to socialist, Svetozar Stojanović ..................................... 164

Workers’ councils in Yugoslavia: successes and failures, Goran Markovic ............................... 201

Historical background of the creation of workers councils ...................................................... 201

Legal solutions ........................................................................................................................... 206

Workers’ councils and reforms of the system ............................................................................ 209

Successes ................................................................................................................................... 213

Failures ...................................................................................................................................... 218

Conclusions ............................................................................................................................... 220

OTHER POST-CAPITALIST EXPERIENCES ......................................................................... 232

Plan, Market and Democracy: the experience of the so-called socialist countries, Catherine Samary

Introduction: theoretical, political and methodological questions ............................................. 233

Social relations and the plan ...................................................................................................... 253

Yugoslav ‘market socialism’ with self-management ................................................................. 256

Updating the Soviet debate on the ‘law of value’ ..................................................................... 267

Conclusion ................................................................................................................................. 290

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................. 307

The law of value in relation to self-management and investment in the economy of the workers states, Ernest Mandel .................................................................................................................. 315

Building socialism in Cuba, Samuel Farber ............................................................................... 335

SUMMING UP AND FURTHER DEBATES ............................................................................ 349

Chile and Portugal in the 1970s: the left, nationalisations and ‘workers’ control’ in the

revolutionary processes, Franck Gaudichaud & Raquel Varela ................................................. 350

Introduction ............................................................................................................................... 350

The debate about ‘workers' control’, nationalisations and ‘people's power’ ............................ 354

Chile 1970-1973: Allende’s government and the nationalisations ............................................ 360

Portugal 1974-1975: nationalisations against workers’ control ................................................ 366

Co-administration and ‘battle for production’ versus cordones industriales and people’s power?

................................................................................................................................................... 369

The struggle for political power: workers’ control in the Portuguese Revolution .................... 377

Conclusions ............................................................................................................................... 386

Latin America: state, popular power and class struggle, Franck Gaudichaud ........................... 395

Eastern Europe: revisiting the ambiguous revolutions of 1989, Catherine Samary ................... 419

Ideological bias of Cold War concepts ...................................................................................... 420

Democratic revolutions or opaque ‘refolutions’? ...................................................................... 432

‘Transition to democracy’? The German symbol: what about ‘Ostalgia’? ............................... 444

The repressed ‘third way’ .......................................................................................................... 448

From the Prague Autumn of workers councils (1968) to the Velvet Revolution (1989):

continuity or antipodes? ............................................................................................................. 455

The struggles for the commons in the Balkans, The Balkan Forum Commons Working Group 463

Concepts, history and evolution ................................................................................................ 463

A radical critical conception of the commons ........................................................................... 467

Balkans as the European periphery ........................................................................................... 468

Existing commons struggles in the Balkans .............................................................................. 472

Commoning the struggle ........................................................................................................... 480

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................. 484

Feminism and the politics of the Commons, Silvia Federici ...................................................... 488

EPILOGUE ................................................................................................................................. 504

Decolonial communism: Analytical, political and democratic dimensions,

Catherine Samary ....................................................................................................................... 505

ABOUT THE AUTHORS .......................................................................................................... 517

About Resistance Books and the IIRE ........................................................................................ 521

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